A much-loved 11-year-old boy tragically shot and killed himself during an online Zoom class.

The child, identified as Adan Llanos, was attending a virtual sixth grade class at Woodbridge Elementary School in San Joaquin County, California, when he turned a gun on himself with the camera and microphone turned off, reports say.

Officers are still investigating the details of the shooting.

It’s not clear whose gun he was using in the incident.

After hearing a gun blast in his room, Adan’s sister – also on a remote learning class elsewhere in the house – dashed into the room to find her fatally-injured brother.

She then told her teacher who called for help, the Lodi News-Sentinel reports.

Deputies responded to the house and found the child with a head injury.

He was rushed to a hospital and sadly died from his self-inflicted injuries, the San Joaquin County sheriff’s office said on social media.

Police said the boy’s family was at his side at the hospital before he passed away.

“Our thoughts are with the family and all those affected by this tragic event,” the Sheriff’s Office said on their Facebook page.

Adan’s aunt told local media that the family wasn’t ready to comment to the media about the boy’s death, but that the tragic death was an accident.

A Facebook tribute post, apparently from the tragic lad’s uncle, also denied reports that the boy had committed suicide.

Luis Llano wrote: “It is with a heavy heart that we inform everyone that on December 2 my nephew; Adan Manuel Llanos, has passed and is in heaven.”

“He was a wonderful child full of life and joy. He was the most respectful and sweetest boy I’ve ever had the honor of calling my nephew! 

“I ask of guys to please help our family in need, if at least share the post! We ask of you all to please refrain from any speculation and if you see any comments politely ask them to only say positive things. 

“He was not suicidal! This young man was an angel that we had the privilege of knowing!”

Another relative launched a fundraising page for his funeral expenses on Thursday morning, which has so far raised $25,000 (£18,500).

Neil Young, headteacher at Woodbridge Elementary, the school that Adan attended, told the local newspaper that everyone at the school knew the boy well and cared deeply for him.

“He was very loving,” Young said. “He always cared about others and always paid attention to when someone around him was feeling down. He was always looking to put a smile on people’s faces.”

The school district has put on specialist counselling services for the students.